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that would trade places with the united states of america. our problems can be solved in our challenges can be met. the path we offer may be harder but it leads to a better place. i am asking you to choose that future. i'm asking you to rally around a set of goals that create new manufacturing jobs here in ohio. that build on what we have already done, to create a new energy strategy for america. building on what we have already done to improve education and break down our -- and turn the page on a decade of war. that is what we can do in the next four years, cincinnati. that is why i'm running for a second term as president of the united states of america. [cheers and applause] [applause] [chanting] >> now i want everybody to be clear the goals we set our concrete and they are achievable. the first part of the plan is to export more products and outsourced cheaper jobs. after a decade of decline, this country has created a half-million new manufacturing jobs in the last two and half years. a whole lot of them here in ohio. when some of these other folks said we should let detroit go bankru
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
reauthorization makes plain that discrimination is not the policy of these united states. it says no program funded by federal vawa dollars can turn away a domestic violence victim because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity, whether the victim is gay or straight, american indian, white, black or latino, in my view, madam president, and in the view of so many in this chamber, they deserve protection from abuse and justice for their abusers. there are two other important changes in this vawa reauthorization as passed through the senate. both of which help ensure we bring perpetrators to justice no national who their victims are or where the claims are committed. these help law enforcement to secure needed testimony from victims who are unwilling to come forward due to reasonable fears of deportation. so in total, all three of these important changes to the substance and scope of vawa i think strengthen it, i think carry forward its initial spirit and i think are completely appropriate things for this senate and the house to do in our every five-year reconsideration and reauth
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
out i'm not against the rand paul amendment be voted on by the united states senate. i do object to the -- an hour equally divided. i object to the fact that we do not have either side-by-side or second-degree amendments, which is the normal parliamentary procedure. and since -- since the majority leader had to inject the number-one objective is defeat barack obama routine again, i would like to point out, this is the least productive congress since 1947. that we have for the first time in 51 years, we're not taking up the defense authorization bill. for the first time in 51 years, when we are fighting a war in afghanistan, that we can't find the time -- we can't find the time in the united states senate to take up the bill that's so important to the security of this nation. so the majority leader should be proud of his record, as i mentioned, including the fact that this congress is the least productive since 1947, but most of all, in 50 years -- in 50 years -- we have not taken up the defense authorization bill and we've taken it up for 50 years because other majority leaders w
tack toy are -- brings out a jar and it's full of disdense that he -- we have that in the united states. and it's sort of different concepts it's not that a dictator disappeared people. but it is that violence and drugs really disappear huge segments of the black community and the bad choices. i began to meet these men and start to think about this. and ask myself, you you know what are their stories. but two, how about operating in a role which i can acknowledge my failures and their failures and respect them despite that. how do i deal with it? i think i deal with trauma. if you have an eye injury, you have eye forms scar tissue over the wound. i was playing soccer, you have to ask me about spanish. when i was playing soccer with latino kids. somebody can kicked the ball and it hit any the eye. my retina almost got detached. i had to see a specialist and it formed over it. it didn't get detached. then the scar formed over the scar. they thought it was at risk of breaking. it was at risk of being detached if i had experienced a huge blunt force trauma to my head. i won't tell you which
a national security standpoint in my memory but the threat is thread is not outside the united states at this time. at their inability to get their act together and in my view the greatest risk we face from national security standpoint. we want to drill in on this today and i want to say a special thank you to these remarkable leaders who have decided, as talking with chairman gray and he said he has been spending too much time on the outside avoiding trouble and now he realizes the country needs to get in the middle of it to make trouble and i'm thankful he is willing to do something like that. let me turn it to sam subeight. one thing i will say when you work for a senator you work your whole life for them and the advantage of coming to csis as i get paid, so he is the chairman of the board. i turn it over to you. >> thank you john, thank you very much. at least i never did to you what my former senate colleague did to george tenet when he was head of the cia. he used them call them up and make his hotel reservations around the world. [laughter] so i'm not that bad, john. thanks joh
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8

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